This demographic tends to rely on news to make money decisions

frank lamjus

Older Americans are putting overwhelming faith in news to inform their financial decisions as compared to the younger generation, according to the first installment of the new Yahoo Finance-Harris poll.

Eighty-one percent of people ages 55 years and older say their money and investment decisions are influenced by the coverage of current events. Only 25% of people between 18 and 34 years old use the news as an information source for their financial decisions.

The results stem from a poll of 2,033 respondents, conducted from June 15 to 17. Yahoo Finance has teamed up with Harris to produce monthly insights on consumer and workplace trends

Fifty-five percent of U.S. adults get their news from social media, according to a 2019 Pew Research Report, up from 47% in 2018. And Facebook (FB) is the top destination among its peers, with 52% of all U.S. adults getting their news from the platform.

Read More

Britain’s biggest businesses make net zero pledge

frank lamjus

Severn Trent boss Liv Garfield - Heathcliff O'Malley
Severn Trent boss Liv Garfield – Heathcliff O’Malley

Some of Britain’s biggest business have committed to cut their carbon emissions to net zero by 2040 as the UK gears up to host crucial international climate talks next year. 

EasyJet, Pearson, Deloitte, Standard Chartered, Unilever and Severn Trent are among almost 50 public and private companies making the pledge ahead of a major meeting on Monday between ministers and business leaders to discuss how businesses can help protect the environment. 

The UK has a legally binding target of reaching net zero emissions by 2050, and ministers are keen to set an example as the UK gears up to host the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference (Cop 26) in Glasgow next year. 

The conference had been due to take place this year but was delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

The more than 200 business leaders attending today’s online meeting will

Read More

Parents and kids hate online classes. Going back to school likely will include more of it.

frank lamjus

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying, ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

Read More

Money Inc: Looking for Deals

frank lamjus

Click here to read the full article.

When coronavirus first hit, beauty investors sheltered in place and routed efforts toward their existing portfolio companies to make sure that those brands could weather the storm. But now that reopening has begun and private equity executives are emerging into a changed world—one that has undergone several months of a pandemic and the global swell of the Black Lives Matter movement—their perspectives on beauty deals have, at least somewhat, been altered.

The fundamentals remain the same: Investors want growing businesses in attractive categories with good management teams and solid brand DNA. But other aspects—like profitability and a strong direct-to-consumer connection—have taken on even more importance, sources said. Diversity, too, has become a priority for leaders as they assemble boards and pick the companies they invest in, with several sources saying they will consciously work to invest in black-owned businesses and hire black executives

Read More

Tech companies make money off your data. Shouldn’t you be paid, too?

frank lamjus

Whenever you sign up for a new social media service or website, or download an app onto your phone or computer, you’ll typically see some long disclaimer written in legalese. You scroll through it quickly and click “I agree.”

This fine print is known as a privacy policy. It lays out (sometimes in the most convoluted way possible) how the site or app can use or share your data. The problem is, no one actually reads it. You just click “Yes” and hope for the best, since that’s the price you pay for a free website, app or social media network. It seems like a pretty sweet deal.

But that’s not the deal we’re getting.

Our phones and computers can track our every movement and action. Facebook and Google log every “like” or click on their sites. There are numerous ways our data are collected, used, shared and sold by

Read More

The best travel credit cards of 2020

frank lamjus

Taking the family on trip? The right credit card can take the hassle out of your vacation.
Taking the family on trip? The right credit card can take the hassle out of your vacation.

— Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you sign up for a credit card after clicking one of our links, we may earn a small fee for referring you. However, our picks and opinions are independent from USA TODAY’s newsroom and any business incentives.

No matter where you want to go, or how you want to get there, using the right credit card can help make your trip smoother and, in certain cases, help it cost less. Credit card rewards and points can be used to offset the cost of your travel and hotel stays, or can even be redeemed for cash back to help you afford a few extra souvenirs.

If you are planning to head out on the road, these are our

Read More

28 Genius Side Hustles You Never Knew Existed

frank lamjus

If the lyrics to the Dolly Parton song “9 to 5” could be your autobiography, maybe it’s time to consider some unconventional ways to make money. After all, if you’re “barely gettin’ by,” you’re probably looking for creative ways to earn extra cash about now.

Whether you’re struggling to pay the bills or just looking to pad your savings account, check out some clever ways to earn a buck that are on the strange side.

Last updated: Dec. 29, 2019

1. Work as a Living Statue

Individual performance artists make money posing as living statues on street corners around the world. There are even companies like the Rhode Island-based Ten31 Productions that hire performers to work as living statues for events such as WaterFire in Providence.

 

2. Deliver Phone Books

It might seem hard to believe, but those old-school phone books that show up on front doorsteps are delivered by

Read More

Brittany Howard Got Personal, and Now Her Music Is More Political Than Ever

frank lamjus

For Pride 2020, GQ’s Give It Up series invites influential artists and athletes to shine a spotlight on charities that are important to them. If you feel inspired—give!

Brittany Howard has never let the world dictate her fate. In her still-young career, her musical outpouring has been relentless: she’s formed three bands (Alabama Shakes, Thunderbitch, and Bermuda Triangle), released four albums (two with the Shakes, one with Thunderbitch, and a recent solo record, Jaime), and worked herself into a dizzy, dripping fever on countless stages. Each successive project has marked a step in a new direction, but none more so than, Jaime, her first nakedly autobiographical album.

Though Howard’s prior music had been personal to varying degrees, Jaime was the sort of work that only she could make, and that she could only make alone. Named after her sister who died of cancer as a teenager, it faced

Read More

Bright Near-Term Outlook for Multiline Insurance Industry

frank lamjus

The Zacks Multiline Insurance industry comprises companies that provide a single insurance coverage, bundling automobile, homeowner, long-term care, life and health insurance to individuals and businesses. The insured pays a single premium and is covered for many things through a single contract.

These companies cover commercial and personal properties, automobiles, marine, livestock, aviation, personal accident, life including permanent and term insurance, supplemental accident and health insurance, workers’ compensation, annuity products, private mortgage insurance, et al. The industry participants also provide risk management services.

Here are the industry’s three major themes:

  • The U.S. multiline-insurance sector should face operational challenges due the pandemic. Slowdown in economic growth might weigh on new sales and insurable exposures. While auto claims are likely to decline, frequency of claims from essential service industries are bound to rise. Further, a spike in mortality will induce higher claim payments for life insurance coverages. A low interest rate and
Read More

94 Money-Making Skills You Can Learn in Less Than a Year

frank lamjus

Learning a new business skill is an excellent way to break into an industry, make yourself more attractive to employers or earn more money and responsibility in your current career. But between work, family and life, the thought of spending years in a classroom can be overwhelming. Fortunately, you don’t have to. It’s possible to learn many in-demand skills in less than a year — some in just a few weeks or months.

Potential earning increases for adding new skills to your resume are wide-ranging, but the more skill you can bring to the table for an employer, the better your advantage over other candidates, the higher your value in your industry and the more negotiating power you’ll have when discussing your wage or salary. Enrich your career and increase your paycheck with these 94 money-making skills and certifications.

Learning touch-typing or 10-key can improve accuracy when drafting documents and … Read More