Dublin Teen Finds Inspiration In Teaching Youth Finance

frank lamjus

A reader submission from Logan Lin of Dublin:

I live in a culture where we are measured by our talents and ability. Yet far too often we overlook the importance of inspiration and initiative. Covid-19 in many ways has catapulted generations to be inspired. This period in our history has transformed the way we see our capabilities. Inspiration was always very elusive to me.

I often wondered as a teenager what truly inspired me. During this period of my life I am confined within the four walls of my home, and my interactions with my friends are “virtual”, my mother found creativity in bread making, and I found inspiration while connecting with a friend, Rohan who creates podcasts on Street Fins.

Inspiration needs 3 things: evocation, transcendence, and initiative. My inspiration was evoked by my father at the age of 8 when I first started getting a weekly allowance and

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Support Black Artists, Creatives, & Entrepreneurs With Airbnb

frank lamjus

As the Black Lives Matter movement continues garnering support on a global scale, there are plenty of ways to take an active part beyond spreading awareness through social media posts. Protests and petitions have been a crucial way to make collective demands for change, but it’s also important for us to make strategic monetary contributions that will support the Black community long term. From fashion brands to beauty businesses, Black-owned companies are starting to receive the long-overdue recognition that they so deserve (if you don’t know about the 15 Percent Pledge yet, read this). And, it doesn’t stop with online shopping — which is exactly where Airbnb comes into play.

If the online trip-booking platform serves as nothing more than a reminder of all the traveling you won’t be doing this summer, we’re here to convince you otherwise. While we haven’t figured out a way to teleport you to that

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What rich people are buying during coronavirus. Hint: It’s not toilet paper

frank lamjus

Miss Diamond Ring founder Michelle Demaree has been regularly selling hefty engagement rings despite the COVID-19 pandemic. <span class="copyright">(Michelle Demaree)</span>
Miss Diamond Ring founder Michelle Demaree has been regularly selling hefty engagement rings despite the COVID-19 pandemic. (Michelle Demaree)

A few weeks after much of the U.S. went into a shutdown because of the coronavirus, Peter Webster, cofounder and president of New York jewelry company Roberto Coin, got a call from a client who was seeking a 25th-anniversary gift for his wife.

In accordance with his client’s budget, Webster sent off a 120-carat diamond necklace, priced at $1.5 million, for consideration.

“That will buy a lot of forgiveness,” Webster said with a laugh a few weeks ago. “We’re seeing quite a few sales in the $50,000-to-$100,000 range. People have this pent-up frustration. They can’t go on their world trip so they will buy jewelry. There’s much more movement than I thought there was going to be.”

Wealthy people are generally still rich despite COVID-19, which has caused economic havoc and

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Here’s How Cartier Is Helping Female Entrepreneurs Make a Big Global Impact

frank lamjus

Click here to read the full article.

Ready for a little good news? Cartier has announced 21 finalists for its Cartier Women’s Initiative, three of which hail from North America. Each year since 2006, the French jewelry and watch maison has used the platform to support female entrepreneurs with start-up businesses aimed at making a social or environmental impact. To date, CWI has given over $3 million to aid 240 women from 56 different countries. Of the various female-run companies to participate over the last 14 years, 80 percent are still in operation 15 years later, according to Cartier CEO Cyril Vigneron. That is an impressive number given that statistically, only 25 percent of new businesses survive to the 15-year marker.

While the businesses that take part in CWI are for profit, Vigneron says their ultimate goal is to make effect change for the good of humanity. “They work deeply

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Why Poetry Books Often Aren’t Accessible to People With Disabilities

frank lamjus

Stack of books.
Stack of books.

A poem comes to my inbox or my podcast feed. Its images give me access to an unfamiliar experience. Its rhythm grips me. Words are the instruments that give sound to its message. The poet has a lesson to teach me, and a lesson isn’t often learned on the first try. I need to read more, so I type the poet’s name into a search bar and discover she’s published a collection. I go to Amazon to download a sample of its contents. There I find a metaphorically locked door. I knock, but the poet doesn’t answer. Chances are, she will never answer — because the collection isn’t available as an e-book, and I read only e-books and online material.

As I’ve written before in essays for The Mighty, I haven’t shunned the traditionally printed word out of mere inconvenience, though I don’t hold it against those

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Can 5G help make it easier to work from home?

frank lamjus

FOSTER CITY, Calif. — Now that so many of us have become accustomed to working from home, one question that might come up is, does 5G really matter anymore? After all, most people are probably connecting to the internet, and all of their work colleagues, with their in-home Wi-Fi via a broadband connection like a cable modem. So, why would they need a different type of fast wireless connection?

Well, it turns out there are quite a few reasons, though some won’t matter much until we start to venture out a bit more.

First, as I wrote about a few weeks back (see “Can 5G become your new broadband connection?”), 5G is starting to become a more viable alternative to cable as a high-speed internet connection source. Thanks to a technology called Fixed Wireless Access (FWA), which is at the heart of Verizon’s 5G Home service, you can get a

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How to Save Time and Money Food Shopping

frank lamjus

Shopping for groceries has been fraught enough of late—and that was before food prices spiked. Now consumers need to find new ways to economize on what they buy at the store while continuing to stay safe as they shop.

Grocery prices rose a seasonally adjusted 1 percent between April and May, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, which tracks the prices of goods and services that Americans consume. That’s not as high as the 2.6 percent increase between March and April. But taken together, those increases mean Americans paid an average 4.8 percent more for “food at home,” as the BLS calls it, than they did in May 2019.

Some of the largest increases are due to events you’ve seen in the news. Beef and veal posted their highest-ever one-month gain, 10.8 percent, the result of temporary shutdowns of meatpacking plants where workers were infected with the coronavirus.

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the reality of being a shop assistant now

frank lamjus

As non-essential retail stores reopened around England, Monday marked the first day back for shop assistants up and down the country. An estimated 1.6million UK shop staff have been furloughed since March, when shops were forced to close due to the coronavirus pandemic.

For most retail staff, Monday’s return to semi-normality offered some relief – the huge crowds that turned out to shop on the high street could encourage anyone to believe that bricks and mortar retail will bounce back. But for all, the new normal also comes with plenty of changes to get used to. 

From managing how customers touch merchandise, to delivering ‘service with a smize’, here, employees at three of the UK’s most popular retail brands share their shop assistant diaries…

“There’s a lot of smizing going on”

says Rachel Pender, store manager for Pandora’s Fosse Park branch in Leicester 

“I got in at 7:30am to make

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I Bought a Car Sight Unseen on the Internet, and I’d Absolutely Do It Again

frank lamjus

Before the coronavirus pandemic, I would have never considered buying a car online without seeing and touching it first. But 60 days into staying home, necessity outweighed hesitation, and I purchased a 2017 Honda Fit on the Carvana app. A week later, the car was delivered contact-free, and the experience exceeded my expectations.

I live in Brooklyn, NY, and while I don’t use a car daily, I like to get out of the city fairly often with my dog. Before shelter-in-place went into effect, I was in the market for a new car: mine was 20 years old, it needed a new windshield and a new side mirror, and I wasn’t willing to put any more money into it.

I had been researching my next car for a few months, and while I had sat in a Honda Fit, I wasn’t comfortable test-driving one after COVID arrived. I was pretty

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City watchdog to tackle high-risk investment loophole that has cost consumers thousands

frank lamjus

The City watchdog is considering closing a major loophole which allows unregulated and high-risk investment schemes to be sold to unsuspecting members of the public.

Charles Randall, chair of the Financial Conduct Authority, admitted that consumers could be exposed to inappropriate investments because they are sold by regulated firms.

This follows a Telegraph Money campaign which called for this flaw in the rules to be tackled, backed by financial industry grandees including former City minister Lord Myners.

At present, regulated firms are able to sell risky, unregulated investments to consumers. This can lead consumers to believe wrongly that such schemes are safe, given the company selling them has been approved by the regulator.

This loophole was highlighted during the collapse of London Capital & Finance, which was able to say it had authorisation from the regulator while selling unregulated “mini-bonds” to customers. Investors face losing their life savings after the

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