Miami-Dade’s RISE loan helps businesses affected by COVID19

frank lamjus

Applications are open for a Miami-Dade County loan that is giving priority to small businesses that have not received federal or state stimulus aid to recover from the economic impact of COVID-19.

RISE Miami-Dade Fund, managed through the Dade County Federal Credit Union and other community financial inclusion institutions, is funded with $25 million from the CARES Act. It was approved by the county commission last month.

This loan comes at a crucial time for small business owners such as restaurants, which have had to reduce the number of employees and are experiencing reduced profits due to new restrictions implemented in response to the spread of the pandemic.

Hundreds of businesses from across Miami-Dade have already submitted applications.

Annie Wilkinson, executive vice president of the Dade County Federal Credit Union, said that the objective is to benefit those small businesses that did not obtain the Payment Protection Loan (PPP) or

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Here’s how small businesses threatened by COVID-19 are surviving the pandemic

frank lamjus

With the unemployment rate at 11.1% and businesses shut down in every state, COVID-19 has taken a crippling toll on America’s economic health.

MORE: Small businesses rethink their approach amid the pandemic to serve their customers

For many small businesses, which comprise 47% of private-sector payrolls in the U.S., according to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council, the sudden economic downturn has created a full-blown crisis.

MORE: When coronavirus hit, these small businesses got creative, but they still need help

The big-picture concern shared by economists is if businesses don’t survive, many Americans won’t have jobs to return to after the pandemic. That’s why experts have said it’s important to support local businesses, which are struggling to generate reliable income.

Now, salons, restaurants, florists and fitness instructors, among others, are creatively adjusting to the new realities of the coronavirus economy, pivoting to bringing parts of their business online, connecting with

Read More

Britain’s biggest businesses make net zero pledge

frank lamjus

Severn Trent boss Liv Garfield - Heathcliff O'Malley
Severn Trent boss Liv Garfield – Heathcliff O’Malley

Some of Britain’s biggest business have committed to cut their carbon emissions to net zero by 2040 as the UK gears up to host crucial international climate talks next year. 

EasyJet, Pearson, Deloitte, Standard Chartered, Unilever and Severn Trent are among almost 50 public and private companies making the pledge ahead of a major meeting on Monday between ministers and business leaders to discuss how businesses can help protect the environment. 

The UK has a legally binding target of reaching net zero emissions by 2050, and ministers are keen to set an example as the UK gears up to host the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference (Cop 26) in Glasgow next year. 

The conference had been due to take place this year but was delayed due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

The more than 200 business leaders attending today’s online meeting will

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Find & Support Black-Owned Businesses With These Apps & Websites

frank lamjus

Following the police killing of George Floyd last month, protests have broken out across the country. We encourage everyone to join the fight by marching in local protests, signing online petitions, donating, and calling your elected officials, but there’s another way to fight systemic racial inequality, and that’s by putting your money where your mouth is. Make a commitment to support Black-owned businesses in your area.

Right now, Twitter users are asking their friends and followers to share their own or their favorite Black-owned businesses. While sifting through social media responses is one way to find spots to support, there are a lot of tweets containing the phrase “Black-owned businesses.” So if you’re looking to find a Black-owned business quickly — perhaps in time for take-out dinner tonight — there are also many useful resources online and in the app store that can help.

Ahead are top-ranking websites

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‘My Black Receipt’ Aims To Make Buying From Black-Owned Businesses More Than A Trend

frank lamjus

The coronavirus pandemic has only compounded the financial challenges faced by the Black community. Black entrepreneurs, for example, were disproportionately affected, with a 40% drop in the number of working Black business owners ― a far greater percentage than any other racial group. 

But the racial wealth gap is not a new problem. As of 2016, the net worth of a typical white family was nearly 10 times greater than that of a Black family ($171,000 vs. $17,150), according to the Brookings Institute

One way you can help solve this disparity is by supporting Black businesses. And a new campaign, My Black Receipt, aims to make that a long-term practice among consumers of all backgrounds. Here’s how to participate.

What Is My Black Receipt?

My Black Receipt is an initiative started by Black upStart, an organization that trains Black entrepreneurs to start job-creating businesses. Kezia Williams, the

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New York firm helps small businesses emerge from the COVID-19 crisis

frank lamjus

Jessica Larios’ baby arrived a few weeks before her due date at the end of February.

The owner of Bella’s Event – an event planning business in Yonkers, New York, specializing in rentals and sales of all things party-related from wedding gowns to quinceañera dresses, table linens and party supplies – Larios could not afford to take time off during one of the busiest months for bookings.

In a haze of feedings and caring for the baby, Larios plowed through her work. Less than a month later, things ground to a halt as the coronavirus pandemic took hold – and cancellations poured in.

Jessica Larios owns Bella’s Events, which specializes in rentals and sales of everything party-related, such as quinceanera dresses, in Yonkers, N.Y. The Acceleration Project, a nonprofit consulting firm, helped Larios navigate the loans process and adapt her business by moving it online.

“I was so worried

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Businesses You Can Start for Under $1,000

frank lamjus

If you’re trying to figure out how to start a business without a big infusion of cash from angel investors or your own savings, don’t despair. There are plenty of cheap businesses you can start that can turn into thriving enterprises.

In fact, you can get a business up and running for less than $1,000. If you’re looking to begin a business without a hefty investment, keep reading to find out how these entrepreneurs turned their business ideas into reality on shoestring budgets.

Last updated Oct. 18, 2019

Blog

  • Initial Investment: $3 a month

Blogging can be the best business to start with little money. Some bloggers actually launch their websites for $0.

Kelan and Brittany Kline started their blog, The Savvy Couple, in 2016 for less than $3 a month. “That cost covered our domain name and hosting at the time,” Kelan said. “From there, we grew our blog

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Support Black-Owned Businesses Every Day, Not Just During Protests

frank lamjus

black owned businesses collage

Heather Polk | @artcuresall

The past few weeks have been draining for Black people. On top of trying to not get coronavirus and dealing with furloughs and layoffs, we’ve had to witness the image of George Floyd taking his last breaths splattered everywhere. Another Black man killed on camera by cops. This comes just weeks after seeing Ahmaud Arbery murdered by white men in cold blood, and hearing about Breonna Taylor being gunned down by police in her own home. The outrage and unrest spawned by these events have gone global in a way that’s making people—white people—take heed.

And part of the response has been directed at lifting up Black-owned businesses—a worthy cause, but something that seems like more of a moment, than a movement. And to some extent, it rubs me the wrong way. Many headlines on publications across the internet (including this outlet right here) have

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3 College Students Raise Money To Help Black Atlanta Businesses

frank lamjus

ATLANTA, GA — Many small businesses in Atlanta have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic. They were forced to temporarily close in March, until Gov. Brian Kemp announced that businesses and restaurants could resume operations in late April.

For some, reopening wasn’t an option. They had lost so much already. As those businesses who could reopen began to do so, a movement for justice rippled through the country after the death of George Floyd on May 25 in police custody in Minnesota. His death — along with the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery in coastal Georgia, Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky, and other African Americans — sparked demands to end police brutality and racism in America.

Here in Atlanta, protests have taken place daily, for over two weeks. Although many have been peaceful, there were instances where some protesters vandalized and stole from local businesses, according to police. With so many

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These small businesses found new ways to serve customers by rethinking their approach

frank lamjus

With more than 42 million people unemployed and businesses shut down in every state, COVID-19 has taken a crippling toll on America’s economic health.

For many small businesses, which comprise 47% of private-sector payrolls in the U.S., according to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council, the sudden economic downturn has created a full-blown crisis.

MORE: When coronavirus hit, these small businesses got creative, but they still need help

The big-picture concern shared by economists is if businesses don’t survive, many Americans won’t have jobs to return to after the pandemic. That’s why experts have said it’s important to support local businesses, which are struggling to generate reliable income.

Now, salons, restaurants, florists and fitness instructors are creatively adjusting to the new realities of the coronavirus economy, pivoting to bringing parts of their business online, connecting with communities directly on social media or launching creative side hustles.

“GMA” put out a … Read More