How much and where do I pay taxes on the extra $600? Your COVID-19 money questions, answered

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It’s hard out there. And, in this time of uncertainty, USA TODAY is working to find answers to your money questions – anything from stimulus checks or unemployment benefits to your 401(k) or retirement plans. You can submit your questions here and read earlier answers below.

We will be updating the Q&A, so check back often. But, also look to these places:

There are a few ways you can pay taxes on your unemployment.

You can choose to have them taken out when applying online for jobless benefits for some states. Or you can fill out Federal Form W-4V Voluntary Withholding Request and have federal taxes automatically have taxes taken out, according to Greene-Lewis. When you fill out the form you can request to have up to 10% taken out, she added. 

Once you are working again, if you have an employer you can adjust your federal tax withholding using … Read More

Gov. Newsom must make face masks mandatory in California to save lives from COVID-19

frank lamjus

The evidence is clear: Cloth masks can help significantly reduce the spread of the coronavirus. That’s why California must make masks mandatory in all public places. Sources say Gov. Gavin Newsom is expected to address the question of mandatory masks today.

Multiple scientific studies show that, until there’s a vaccine, cloth masks will provide our best defense against the unchecked spread of the virus that causes COVID-19. That’s why all Californians should gladly do their part and wear masks in public places.

“This protective measure alone significantly reduced the number of infections, that is, by over 78,000 in Italy from April 6 to May 9 and over 66,000 in New York City from April 17 to May 9,” according to a recent study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. “Other mitigation measures, such as social distancing implemented in the United States, are insufficient by themselves in

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New York firm helps small businesses emerge from the COVID-19 crisis

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Jessica Larios’ baby arrived a few weeks before her due date at the end of February.

The owner of Bella’s Event – an event planning business in Yonkers, New York, specializing in rentals and sales of all things party-related from wedding gowns to quinceañera dresses, table linens and party supplies – Larios could not afford to take time off during one of the busiest months for bookings.

In a haze of feedings and caring for the baby, Larios plowed through her work. Less than a month later, things ground to a halt as the coronavirus pandemic took hold – and cancellations poured in.

Jessica Larios owns Bella’s Events, which specializes in rentals and sales of everything party-related, such as quinceanera dresses, in Yonkers, N.Y. The Acceleration Project, a nonprofit consulting firm, helped Larios navigate the loans process and adapt her business by moving it online.

“I was so worried

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B.C. warns ‘it only takes one person’ to spread COVID-19, U.S.-Canada border to remain closed

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Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 99,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,200 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

June 16

6:50 p.m.: COVID-19 questions of the day

6:45 p.m.: ‘Once this virus is anywhere, it’s a risk everywhere’

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How hucksters and would-be profiteers invaded California’s online COVID-19 marketplace

frank lamjus

In early April, Gov. Gavin Newsom launched a website where people and companies could help California gear up for the coronavirus pandemic.

The portal was designed as a marketplace for middlemen, manufacturers and business giants to pitch deals and donations with the state, which was scrambling to obtain medical supplies to fight COVID-19.

For some, the site was a chance to clear out their closets.

Someone in Los Angeles found seven masks while cleaning out an apartment and asked to donate them. A Santa Rosa resident offered an ice machine, an orthopedic boot and two N95 masks that were leftover from the 2017 wildfires.

“Sorry,” the person said, “that’s all I had left.”

Along with these small gestures, the portal soon became cluttered with hundreds of questionable offers and a dizzying array of sales pitches, a Sacramento Bee review of more than 6,000 submissions found. Hucksters looked to cash-in on

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Pandemic car buying: Consumer strategies for the age of COVID-19 and beyond

frank lamjus

To buy a car, you need money. To have money, you need a job, unless you’re cruising on investments. So for many of the 40 million unemployed Americans — only the most recent, crushing count — happy talk about buying a car is bound to chafe. 

But while the pandemic is kneecapping new-car sales, which are expected to fall about 27 percent to just 12.5 million units in 2020, tens of millions of Americans will still buy a car this year. Used cars have generated 40 million to 45 million retail sales in recent years, dwarfing sales of new models. 

So whether it’s industry rah-rah or not, the pandemic has automakers and dealers pulling out all the stops to lure shoppers back. While it’s a buyer’s market, consumers need good advice to navigate it without tripping themselves up — including by falling for screaming “deals” that aren’t what they’re cracked

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Work on commission? What if you work in two states, how are the extra $600 applied? Your COVID-19 money questions, answered

frank lamjus

It’s hard out there. And, in this time of uncertainty, USA TODAY is working to find answers to your money questions – anything from stimulus checks or unemployment benefits to your 401(k) or retirement plans. You can submit your questions here and read earlier answers below.

We will be updating the Q&A, so check back often. But, also look to these places:

You should. The Pandemic Unemployment Assistance program allows a much larger pool of workers to get jobless benefits when their work is affected by the virus. Check online with your state’s unemployment office to get more clarity.

The $600 is in addition to the amount determined under state law, according to the CARES Act. This means you can calculate what you are eligible to receive by any state and add on the $600. It doesn’t say it is per claim or per state, says Toby Mathis, a partner … Read More

5 financial weapons you can use to fight the COVID-19 economy

frank lamjus

As the coronavirus threatens the health and wealth of Americans, consumers are fighting back by arming themselves with basic financial tools they may have overlooked before.

They’re rushing to sign up for products and plans that will protect their incomes, lifestyles and loved ones from the virus and the severe economic fallout that has tipped the U.S. into its first recession in over a decade.

Here are five financial tools that have become essential during the pandemic. If you haven’t included them in your money strategy, maybe it’s time to make room.

1. Life insurance

Chompoo Suriyo / Shutterstock
The pandemic has raised awareness about life insurance.

The rising toll from COVID-19 is a reminder that life is fragile — which has led to surging sales of life insurance policies.

“We believe there are many people who have been putting off buying life insurance, and the pandemic is creating

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Responding to COVID-19 | PA.GOV

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On May 4, 2020, Governor Wolf provided guidance that details procedures businesses must follow to conduct in-person operations in counties that move to the yellow phase of reopening.

All businesses, including non-profits, permitted to conduct in-person operations are subject to this guidance. This guidance is based on the building safety and business safety orders, under which nearly all life-sustaining businesses have been operating during the red phase.

Under the yellow phase of reopening, life-sustaining businesses that could not conduct either all or part of their operations via telework will continue to conduct their operations in-person, and many non-life-sustaining businesses will be permitted to restart their in-person operations through the loosening of some restrictions under the stay-at-home and business closure orders.

Protecting Employees

All businesses that have been conducting their operations in whole or in part remotely through individual teleworking must continue telework operations for each of those employees.

All businesses

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Degree of Future COVID-19 Revenue Impact Is ‘Simply Unknowable’

frank lamjus

Chubb Chairman and CEO Evan Greenberg insists the global P/C insurer has strong fundamentals, but warned at the same time that the ongoing pandemic crisis will spur unpredictable revenue challenges affecting many lines of coverage.

Broadly speaking, the insurer will likely take hits on the liability side and earnings via at least a temporary reduction in premium revenues, Greenberg explained during an April 22 investor call held to discuss Chubb’s Q1 2020 earnings.

“Our growth momentum, particularly in our commercial [property/casualty] business globally, continued into April, and we continue to experience improved rate to exposure,” Greenberg said. “As we go forward, offsetting that, will be a meaningful impact to growth from the health and economic crisis as exposures in important areas shrink for a time, with the impact varying by country,” Greenberg said.

Consumer-related lines including travel insurance, A&H “discretionary purchases” and automobile insurance will all take hits, as customers

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