Health Insurance Options Amid Pandemic

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For the tens of millions of Americans who have lost their jobs, there is another frightening reality to absorb: amid a global health pandemic, they no longer have health insurance. This is one of the big problems with having insurance linked to a workplace plan, but for more than 156 million Americans, or just under half of the country’s total population, that’s the coverage they have.

According to healthcare advocacy group Families USA, layoffs between February and May meant that 5.4 million workers lost their health insurance coverage, “an increase nearly 40 percent higher than the largest previous annual increase in uninsured adults ever recorded.” If you suddenly find yourself uninsured, there are three choices for coverage: COBRA, the Affordable Care Act, and Medicaid.

Let’s start with COBRA (Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act), the federal rule that requires group health plans “to provide a temporary continuation of group health coverage

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Google is about to show us just how much damage the pandemic has done

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  • Google is set to report its second-quarter earnings on Thursday. It’s the company’s first quarter to take place entirely within the pandemic.
  • Analysts are expecting a revenue decline, but there could be signs of recovery for Google’s advertising business.
  • All eyes will be on YouTube and Cloud as possible bright spots. Analysts are also interested to see if Google mentions plans for its costly moonshot projects.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

It’s a busy week for Alphabet CEO Sundar Pichai.

He is testifying before Congress as part of Wednesday’s antitrust hearing, and on Thursday he’ll announce the company’s second-quarter earnings — and reveal just how much damage the pandemic has done to Google’s business.

Google managed to sail through the first quarter for the most part with ease, but its revenue took a big blow in the final few weeks of March, offering a preview of what might

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Analysis finds 5.5M have lost health insurance amid pandemic

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Nearly 5.5 million people who lost their jobs between February and May of this year also lost their health insurance, according to a new analysis released Tuesday. 

The analysis from Families USA, a consumer health care advocacy organization, finds that the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic crisis have caused the greatest health insurance losses in American history. 

Nearly half of the coverage losses occurred in five states: California, Texas, Florida, New York and North Carolina. 

“Families in America are losing comprehensive health insurance in record numbers,” the authors of the analysis wrote. “This creates particularly serious dangers during a grave public health crisis and deep economic downturn.”

Coverage losses are likely steep because about half of Americans get health coverage through their jobs. 

However, the 5.4 million people who are estimated to have also lost their health insurance doesn’t count family members who might also have been on those

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How Ocado went from understated British grocer to an $18.4 billion tech giant, as the coronavirus pandemic confirms the future of grocery shopping is online

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"Bots" are seen on the grid (or "The Hive") of Ocado's "smart platform" in Andover, Britain, on May 1, 2018.
“Bots” are seen on the grid (or “The Hive”) of Ocado’s “smart platform” in Andover, Britain, on May 1, 2018.

REUTERS/Peter Nicholls

  • As grocery stores worldwide experienced stockpiling, long lines, and health worries amid the coronavirus pandemic, millions of people turned to shopping online.

  • It has been a goldrush for the British company Ocado, an online-only grocery marketplace that also operates technology for supermarket giants worldwide.

  • Ocado was the best performing stock on the FTSE 100 in the second quarter of 2020, and, in May, Ocado raised over $1 billion to grow its services.

  • It is now betting big on its US expansion, hoping to convert Americans to grocery shopping online.

  • Huge challenges remain, though. Many Americans are still reluctant to buy food they can’t see in person, and some fear the current online pandemic-driven boom could prove a one-off.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The coronavirus pandemic

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Here’s how small businesses threatened by COVID-19 are surviving the pandemic

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With the unemployment rate at 11.1% and businesses shut down in every state, COVID-19 has taken a crippling toll on America’s economic health.

MORE: Small businesses rethink their approach amid the pandemic to serve their customers

For many small businesses, which comprise 47% of private-sector payrolls in the U.S., according to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council, the sudden economic downturn has created a full-blown crisis.

MORE: When coronavirus hit, these small businesses got creative, but they still need help

The big-picture concern shared by economists is if businesses don’t survive, many Americans won’t have jobs to return to after the pandemic. That’s why experts have said it’s important to support local businesses, which are struggling to generate reliable income.

Now, salons, restaurants, florists and fitness instructors, among others, are creatively adjusting to the new realities of the coronavirus economy, pivoting to bringing parts of their business online, connecting with

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The coronavirus pandemic ‘has undone years of work’ for women, Yahoo Finance survey shows

frank lamjus

Women, especially middle-aged ones, have been hit the hardest by the coronavirus pandemic in terms of job loss, fewer options for remote work, and needing more time to recover financially from the crisis, according to a new survey from Harris Poll and Yahoo Finance. 

Nearly all men between the ages of 35 and 44 — 96% — were still working the same job as before the pandemic, only 60% of women the same age were, according to the survey of 2033 Americans. The latest unemployment rate shows 8.9% unemployment for men in that age group and 9.4% for women in June.

Read more: Here’s how to navigate changes in your career

A similar discrepancy shows up between men and women who are 45 to 54. More than three-quarters of men that age have the same job, but just under 6 in 10 women do, the survey found.

That difference, among

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Queer Eye’s Tan France Uses His ‘Hellacious’ Start in Business to Help Owners During the Pandemic

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When it comes to launching a small business amid tough economic times, Tan France can certainly relate.

“I started building my business within the [2007-09] recession, which was so unwise but I had no other choice,” the Queer Eye star, who founded fashion brand Kingdom & State, tells PEOPLE. “The first year-and-a-half, in particular, was so dire.”

“I started very late 2009, and 2010 was a wash. Then in 2011, I learned how to change things up to make it appropriate for what people were actually going through at that time,” France, 37, continues. “So I absolutely know what it means to pivot your business and switch things up to cater to the new market or audience.”

What France didn’t know, however, was that his experience would benefit him years later as he takes on his newest venture: starring on Facebook Watch’s Boost My Business, a show where he

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How to Shop Online Safely During the Pandemic

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Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

Even as stores reopen in many parts of the country, people are still shopping online more than ever. And that includes using new sites set up by their favorite small businesses attempting to stay afloat through perilous economic times.

But be careful, experts warn, because cybercriminals are flocking to e-commerce sites, too. Their favorite crimes include opening fake accounts at retail sites and hijacking real ones through identity theft.

Online fraud was already on the rise before COVID-19, largely thanks to the rollout of chip-and-signature technology, which has made the in person credit-card fraud of the past a lot tougher to pull off.

Account takeovers jumped 72 percent in 2019, to 13 million cases, according to the most recent figures from the security firm Javelin, which tracks financial crime. Losses from consumer fraud in the U.S. hit $16.9 billion

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A wave of people turned to OnlyFans to earn money when they lost their jobs due to the pandemic

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sex health sexual genitals female male anatomy peach crotch orgasm pleasure same sex reproduction penis testicles anal vagina vibrator toy sperm uterus ovaries condom safe sex cox 152

Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • OnlyFans, IsMyGirl, and other pay-per-view adult subscription sites are remodeling adult entertainment, with some creators earning over $100,000 in one year.

  • OnlyFans reported a 75% uptick in “model sign-ups” in early April, as unemployment skyrocketed around the world due to coronavirus shutdowns.

  • A number of creators told Insider they joined the site as a way to earn income after losing their jobs due to COVID-19 layoffs. 

  • Porn viewers are willing to pay: traffic on OnlyFans has been climbing, and shot up 15% in less than 24 hours after Beyoncé mentioned the site on the “Savage” remix, released in April.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Before the pandemic, Harper, 26, enjoyed her jobs in the Midwest. Working as a

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Crunch time for China’s robot startups as pandemic brings pain and opportunities

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By David Kirton

SHENZHEN, China (Reuters) – With glowing blue eyes and trusting feline features, a new robot cat by Chinese startup Elephant Robotics seems happily oblivious to the worries of CEO Joey Song as he shows it off at the company’s lab in Shenzhen.

Elephant Robotics’ main business is the automation of factory assembly lines but revenue has plunged by a third this year due to the coronavirus, leading the company to cut staff by a fifth.

“It’s tough,” said Song. “Before, we had more than 30 people.”

Due to the downturn, the firm is putting more energy into the robot cat project funded on Kickstarter in December. Readying its first large batch of 1,000 cats for sale, it hopes that as more consumers work from home, interest in pet robots will grow.

“If the industrial robots can’t sell right now, we just focus on other robots to lower

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