Parents and kids hate online classes. Going back to school likely will include more of it.

frank lamjus

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying, ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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Student finance guide for parents and partners

frank lamjus

You might need to give Student Finance England information about your income if your child or partner has applied for student finance that’s based on your household income.

You’ll be asked for financial details for the last full tax year previous to the start of the academic year. For example, if the student is applying for the 2019/20 academic year, the tax year will be 2017/18. Student Finance England will ask for details of the previous tax year because this is the most recent full tax year at the time applications open.

Your information will be used to work out if your child or partner can get extra Maintenance Loan on top of the Tuition Fee Loan and basic Maintenance Loan.

If your income in the current tax year is likely to be at least 15% lower than the previous tax year, Student Finance England can assess your household income

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