Avast Business Launches Small Office Protection to Deliver Complete Online Security

frank lamjus

The new product provides all-in-one protection for small businesses, entrepreneurs, and home offices, which are becoming an increasing target for cybercriminals

REDWOOD CITY, Calif., July 30, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Avast (LSE: AVST), a global leader in digital security and privacy products, today announced the launch of Avast Business Small Office Protection, a solution for small businesses that provides robust, real-time cyber protection that’s easy to install and cost-effective. Securing up to 10 business devices, the product is ideal for entrepreneurs and home offices.

Avast Business Logo (PRNewsfoto/Avast)
Avast Business Logo (PRNewsfoto/Avast)

Entrepreneurs and small business owners are increasingly aware of the risks of cyberattacks, with the U.S. Small Business Administration reporting 88 percent feeling vulnerable. However, budget, time, and IT expertise constraints often prevent them from investing in business-ready cybersecurity.

Small Office Protection by Avast Business is an all-in-one security solution for small businesses that protects all types of devices, protecting a maximum

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More Than Half of Small Business Owners Expect Revenue Drop in 2020

frank lamjus

Few small businesses are likely to emerge from the pandemic unscathed, and a majority expect to see their revenue fall in what’s shaping up to be a challenging year.

As companies adapt to the coronavirus outbreak that’s causing disruptions to normal life across the world, financial services company TD Bank surveyed small business owners to see how they’re handling the crisis. The survey found that while nearly half (47%) of small business owners have been able to avoid closing their doors even temporarily during the pandemic, that hasn’t been enough for many, as they are still seeing significant declines in earnings.

Lower expectations among business owners

Throughout the pandemic, small businesses have grappled with new uncertainties. In fact, one earlier survey found that more than half of small businesses didn’t expect to survive the pandemic.

Among all small business owners surveyed by TD Bank, 58% said they expect their revenue

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Kabbage Is Aiming to Disrupt Small Business Finance

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Kabbage, which is a leading online payments and lending operator, has taken the 24th spot on CNBC’s Disruptor list for 2020 (this compares to 14 last year).

Image of a hand signing a paper with the loan as the title

Source: shutterstock

No doubt, the fintech industry has been disrupting the traditional financial services industry in a big way, as seen with companies like Stripe, Lemonade (NYSE:LMND) and Square (NYSE:SQ). So yes, as the industry has grown, so has the value Kabbage stock, with the valuation over $1 billion.

OK then, so let’s first take a deeper look at the company. The CEO and co-founder is Rob Frohwein. When the U.S. was in the financial crisis in 2008, he saw how companies like Amazon.com (NASDAQ:AMZN) and eBay (NASDAQ:EBAY) were leveraging APIs to provide access to valuable datasets.

He thought: Why not leverage this technology to

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Layoffs Loom as Small Business Loans Run Out

frank lamjus

Small business aid is likely to be another important component in the next coronavirus relief bill. Lawmakers are expected to extend the $660 billion Paycheck Protection Program, which provides forgivable loans to small business owners, with the goal of keeping workers on the payroll. The PPP still has more than $100 billion to loan, and Congress may add more to the fund while extending the deadline for participation.

However, some economists and business owners are questioning the design of the program, which was intended to provide a short-term bridge across a brief recession. Now, as the economic slowdown persists, some small business owners are finding that their loans are running out before their revenues have recovered, forcing them to lay off workers once again.

One small business owner described the program to The Washington Post this way: “It was just a Band-Aid on a bullet wound. All it really did

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Here’s how small businesses threatened by COVID-19 are surviving the pandemic

frank lamjus

With the unemployment rate at 11.1% and businesses shut down in every state, COVID-19 has taken a crippling toll on America’s economic health.

MORE: Small businesses rethink their approach amid the pandemic to serve their customers

For many small businesses, which comprise 47% of private-sector payrolls in the U.S., according to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council, the sudden economic downturn has created a full-blown crisis.

MORE: When coronavirus hit, these small businesses got creative, but they still need help

The big-picture concern shared by economists is if businesses don’t survive, many Americans won’t have jobs to return to after the pandemic. That’s why experts have said it’s important to support local businesses, which are struggling to generate reliable income.

Now, salons, restaurants, florists and fitness instructors, among others, are creatively adjusting to the new realities of the coronavirus economy, pivoting to bringing parts of their business online, connecting with

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Meet Thrilling, An Online Marketplace That Supports Small Vintage Stores

frank lamjus

When the pandemic hit, Thrilling, an online marketplace that offers vintage and secondhand clothing from small businesses around the country, cut its commissions for the first two months. After brick-and-mortar businesses were forced to close their doors, and thus lose their main source of income, founder and CEO Shilla Kim-Parker knew that those owners needed every dollar they could make. Thrilling then released custom-printed vintage T-shirts to raise money for the 100+ stores it carries (you can still purchase them or donate to stores here). When protests started around the country, following the murder of George Floyd at the hands of the police, Thrilling curated a collection of clothing from Black-owned vintage stores — although, as a Black woman, Kim-Parker had amplified these businesses since the start of Thrilling, giving them the exposure they desperately need in a fashion industry that still prioritizes whiteness.

Kim-Parker, whose prior careers were in

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New York firm helps small businesses emerge from the COVID-19 crisis

frank lamjus

Jessica Larios’ baby arrived a few weeks before her due date at the end of February.

The owner of Bella’s Event – an event planning business in Yonkers, New York, specializing in rentals and sales of all things party-related from wedding gowns to quinceañera dresses, table linens and party supplies – Larios could not afford to take time off during one of the busiest months for bookings.

In a haze of feedings and caring for the baby, Larios plowed through her work. Less than a month later, things ground to a halt as the coronavirus pandemic took hold – and cancellations poured in.

Jessica Larios owns Bella’s Events, which specializes in rentals and sales of everything party-related, such as quinceanera dresses, in Yonkers, N.Y. The Acceleration Project, a nonprofit consulting firm, helped Larios navigate the loans process and adapt her business by moving it online.

“I was so worried

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small stores try to make up for lost time

frank lamjus

As non-essential stores start to open their doors once more, The Telegraph speaks to four small retailers about how Monday went for them – and what they expect in the weeks ahead. 

Beverley Edmondson, Beverley Edmondson Millinery, Farnham

“We make money three months of the year – and those three months have now gone”.

For many it would be hard to be upbeat in the circumstances, but Beverley Edmondson, who owns an eponymous millinery in Farnham was no different. 

“We’re very heavily based on the weddings industry and events like Ascot. We’ve lost our season and demand for our core product will be very lacking until the situation around events changes.”

During the lockdown, Beverley made some sales online, but nowhere near enough to make up for what was usually her peak season. 

“We’ve re-opened, but largely by appointment. I was pleasantly surprised with footfall, but one of the reasons

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Americans Want To Shop Small, Here’s How To Make Them Customers

frank lamjus

With the prominence of things like Small Business Saturday during the holiday shopping season and the slow food movement attracting customers to local restaurants that also source local ingredients, consumers have grown increasingly aware of the benefits of patronizing businesses in their community.

Now a recently released survey commissioned by Groupon, Inc. (NASDAQ: GRPN) and conducted by market research company OnePoll reveals that the global COVID-19 pandemic has heightened that awareness to a new high.

Pent-up Demand

The survey, which was conducted over the first five days of May among 2,000 Americans, showed that 75% of respondents plan to increase their support of local businesses as quarantine lockdown measures are cautiously lifted.

The survey found that the pandemic compelled consumers to confront the tenuous position most U.S. businesses found themselves in as they shut down in the interest of public safety. Not only this, but consumers were also forced to

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These small businesses found new ways to serve customers by rethinking their approach

frank lamjus

With more than 42 million people unemployed and businesses shut down in every state, COVID-19 has taken a crippling toll on America’s economic health.

For many small businesses, which comprise 47% of private-sector payrolls in the U.S., according to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council, the sudden economic downturn has created a full-blown crisis.

MORE: When coronavirus hit, these small businesses got creative, but they still need help

The big-picture concern shared by economists is if businesses don’t survive, many Americans won’t have jobs to return to after the pandemic. That’s why experts have said it’s important to support local businesses, which are struggling to generate reliable income.

Now, salons, restaurants, florists and fitness instructors are creatively adjusting to the new realities of the coronavirus economy, pivoting to bringing parts of their business online, connecting with communities directly on social media or launching creative side hustles.

“GMA” put out a … Read More